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Home is Where the Radishes Grow (FIGT 2017)

Guleraana and I are back in London, after a whirlwind week at the Families in Global Transition conference in The Hague, Netherlands. It was an inspiring, identity-affirming, provocative, exhausting few days with hundreds of fellow cross-culture people, educators, psychologists, researchers, writers, and others who work with globally-mobile communities. Our tribe.

Guleraana and about a quarter of our workshop circle at FIGT.

We presented some video and audio from a recent performance of Home Is Where… and demonstrated our accompanying cross-culture drama workshop. Guleraana is an absolute champion, squeezing what’s usually a 2-hour workshop into 30 minutes!

It was wonderful to run the workshop with a group of people who had already spent a day and a half at the conference (and quite a bit of their lives and careers), thinking deeply about ideas of home, identity, culture, and belonging.

After some get-to-know-you warm up games, we asked, ‘What does home mean to you?’ and jotted down the responses on a flip chart. The familiar themes of family, comfort, memory… and the deer-in-headlights ‘uhhhhhh….’ that so many TCKs and CCKs identify with.

This group also came up with a few that we hadn’t heard before: ‘it’s where I go to the dentist’ was one-upped by ‘where I go to the gynaecologist!’ And then someone shouted out, ‘Radishes!’ and explained that growing and eating radishes from her own garden made her feel at home. Radishes are such a specific example, but the feeling of growing your own food is something universal. I can get behind the idea that home is where the radishes grow.

planting, picking, and eating radishes

From the brainstorm, we created tableaux of the themes – ‘frozen pictures’ that can become the starting point for a scene. I was intrigued by the challenge of making a tableaux of ‘radishes’ so of course I immediately joined that group.

Others created pictures of a giant question mark on the floor, a child swinging between two parents, and yes, even a gynaecologist’s office.

We hope that the teachers, coaches, and psychologists who joined us will be inspired to bring drama games and storytelling into their work with students and clients…

And in a few weeks time, we’ll be doing it all again, but in a sort of opposite way. At FIGT, we were sharing drama techniques with cross-cultural experts; at the NYU Forum on Ethnodrama, we’ll be introducing the idea of Third Culture Kids to our colleagues in the theatre community.

(If anyone from the FIGT session has any feedback or ideas that could help our next presentation, we’d love to hear them! Comment below or email me: [email protected])

And of course, I can’t leave out our crowdfunding link… Guleraana and I are freelance artists, investing in the future of our project Home Is Where… by attending these conferences. Can you help us get there? Thank you!

Home Is Where… development at Rich Mix

What a milestone! Home Is Where… finally had its first full-length performance on 2nd September at Rich Mix, a fantastically supportive and welcoming multi-arts venue in East London. Huge thanks are due to the wonderful team there, and of course to the extremely dedicated and talented cast and creative team of Home Is Where…: writer Guleraana Mir, producer Clarissa Widya, composer and sound designer Yaiza Varona, movement director Paula Paz, and performers Sharlit Deyzac, Joanna Greaney, Leonora Fyfe, Mark Ota, and Kal Sabir.

As well as celebrating what we’ve achieved in this latest phase of the project, I also want to take a moment to acknowledge that this was probably the most challenging creative process I’ve ever experienced. It’s the largest team I’ve ever led, the most personal show I’ve ever created, the most technically ambitious project I’ve ever attempted, and also the shortest period I’ve ever given myself to achieve all these things. Maybe I shouldn’t be surprised, then, that the performance itself represents the biggest gap between the astronomical potential of the idea and the reality of what we’ve been able to put on stage so far. It’s been a long road already, and we still have a long way to go, but we will get there.

I believe in this project, and this team, and this incredibly difficult but brilliant process of devising. I believe that the raw materials of this project are truly special, and that our interviews with dozens of Third Culture Kids will make urgent, powerful, necessary theatre. I believe in the risks that we’ve taken, and I believe they will pay off in the final production.

In our scratch performance back in January, we focused on dynamic ways to present the verbatim interviews, using movement and music to enhance the headphone verbatim performance. The result was fun and maybe a bit too upbeat to be a true reflection of the TCK experience. We also felt that what we’d made lacked an overall narrative, something to give it the drive necessary for a full-length show.

So in this R&D performance, we looked for shadows to balance out that bright tone – and we didn’t have to look far, thanks to the Brexit vote happening in the middle of our devising process. We created a narrative-heavy dystopian world that almost swallowed up our interviews, the most rich and beautiful element of the project. Now that we’ve found those extremes of tone and form – and a lot of really interesting performance techniques – we can choose where to steer the next version of the play…

I’ve learned a lot over the last year as we’ve created this new company and started to bring Home Is Where… to life. And I still have a lot of questions, too, which I know can only be answered by continuing to make work, both this piece and future projects, too. These are questions I’m going to spend the next 10 years of my career answering. Maybe more…

How can you tell from ten separate phone calls and coffee dates how a new company is going to work together? How can you guess how much devising time, writing time, and rehearsal time a new piece is going to need? How can you invite an audience into the creative process so that they’re expecting a piece in development, while still giving them an excellent and exciting performance to enjoy? How do you manage expectations – on both sides of the fourth wall – and keep the pressure of performance from short-cutting the process of creating the best possible piece of theatre?

And now… what’s next?

Well, first off, there are several other aspects of this project that we’re developing alongside the performance. Guleraana delivered a pre-show workshop in partnership with Hope Not Hate, which was a great success and loads of fun. She used drama games and lively discussion to explore the themes of the play, and we’re tailoring her plans for a visit to an international school next week. She and I will co-facilitate, with two of our actors demonstrating their headphone verbatim technique by sharing some of our TCK stories. I can’t wait!

We’ve also got loads of encouraging, helpful feedback from our audience to consider before heading back into a new script development phase. I’m sure it won’t be long before we get out trusty sticky notes again and have a crack at a brand new draft…

Watch this space, Twitter, the Facebook page, or sign up for the email newsletter to get updates when we’re back with a whole new version of Home Is Where… again!

 

Home Is Where… devising to scripting

Home Is Where A5 flyer - MarkIt’s been a couple of weeks since our final devising session of the summer, and we’ve said goodbye for now to our wonderful and generous friends at Kings Place Music Foundation, who welcomed us for six weeks of testing out new performance techniques, developing characters, and knitting together our creative team.

I detailed our progress from the first four weeks of devising in a previous blog post here. So, to continue the story:

In our fifth session, we explored different modes of performing verbatim material from our interviews (which you can listen to on our Oral History Library on Soundcloud), created a beautiful ritual for the characters’ transition from the Resistance reality into the verbatim reality, sorted out some of the technical logistics of our headphone verbatim technique, improvised a soundscape of the Resistance HQ where the play takes place, and played a very fun and illuminating game with movement director Paula Paz to discover new dimensions of character relationships.

(I also discovered a catch to our system of documenting the devising sessions with Google Hangout On Air broadcasts: it only works if you press START BROADCAST at the beginning!! I went to turn the thing off at the end and realised that it had not been recording for the past 4 hours while we were being brilliant. Just an unfortunate mistake, but it got me thinking about how much tech I’m able to handle all at once… with the projection set-up, bluetooth speakers, headphones and verbatim audio players, the extra video was apparently just one thing too many. One day we’ll have a stage manager…)

Home Is Where teamIn our sixth and final session (which I did manage to document), we really hit our stride with bringing together the different elements of the performance, and sharing leadership among our creative team. Composer Yaiza Varona led an improvisation of a new “Nationless Anthem” based on her original composition for our scratch performances earlier this year, with the cast deconstructing and remixing new lyrics from writer Guleraana Mir. Paula led the cast through a “military training” exercise that will form the basis of a Resistance montage, and Guleraana brought in some new pages of text inspired by the previous weeks of character and narrative development in devising. Producer Clarissa Widya and I led a big-picture discussion at the beginning and end of the day, looking ahead to our rehearsal period at Rich Mix and inviting feedback and impulses from the ensemble.

Scripting at the AlbanyAnd then, just like that, devising is done and we’re on to the next phase: shaping all these impulses, elements, and ideas into a coherent and cohesive script. Guleraana and I got together with a stack of sticky notes (one of my all-time favourite creative tools!) and made a list of the Things We Could Do: ideas of visual moments, technical possibilities, thematic concepts, character relationships… Those became magenta sticky notes: “political context soundscape,” “tweets from outside HQ,” “headphone verbatim broadcast projection,” “lighting actors with torches in blackout.”

Some of those ideas have narratives intrinsically attached to them, so we started putting them together with plot points, things we knew we wanted to happen during the course of the play, and developments in character relationships.

Before long, our sticky notes found their way into a rough 3-act structure, which Guleraana has sent off to the cast and creative team. Now she’s working on putting dialogue into the framework, I’m combing through our 30+ hours of verbatim interview material to choose sections to feature, Yaiza is starting to write music for the opening soundscape, and Paula is sketching out a choreography to teach the cast on our first day of rehearsal. Clarissa is creating beautiful flyers and getting the word out to audiences about the show (among about a thousand other things – producing is a hugely varied and demanding job!).

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In a perfect world, we’d have more time (read: funding) to develop the overall structure with the cast, layering in their impulses, new character discoveries, alternative narrative ideas, more complex technical designs, and working together to fill in the details of the big picture.  As it stands, we won’t know until we start our rehearsals at Rich Mix (in just two weeks’ time!) exactly how all the elements will all come together, and then we’ll have just 8 rehearsal days before Home Is Where takes the stage.

But this is a surprising and fruitful way to make theatre, an exhilarating risk we take with our work, and I am so excited to share our hot-off-the-press play. It’s been years of development (we started interviewing Third Culture Kids in 2014) and yet it still feels “soon” to be bringing Home Is Where to its first audience. And in some ways, this performance at Rich Mix is just the beginning: from here, we’re planning a longer run of performances in London (probably after further edits to the script, another rehearsal period, and an expansion of our design team), and eventually a tour around the UK.

HnH-charity-landscape-altFor now, this is your chance to catch Home Is Where! Tickets are available now on the Rich Mix website for our one-night-only performance on the 2nd of September – and check out Guleraana’s free pre-show workshop, using performance games and inclusive discussion to delve into the themes of the play: home, culture, and belonging. The workshop is offered in partnership with HOPE not hate as part of their #MoreInCommon campaign. September 2-4 is a national Weekend of HOPE.

 

Stay tuned for more updates from the rehearsal room shortly! Thanks for reading.


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Devising Home Is Where… (again!)

IMG_0025It’s so great to get back into the devising process with our wonderful TCK team! After our scratch at Camden People’s Theatre in January, we’re now working towards the first full-length performance of Home Is Where… which we’ll present at Rich Mix on 2nd September.

I’m so delighted to be working with some new collaborators: producer Clarissa Widya; multimedia consultant Ilayda Arden, sound designer Keri Chesser, and performer Leonora Fyfe; as well as continuing to collaborate with writer Guleraana Mir, composer Yaiza Varona, movement director Paula Paz and performers Sharlit Deyzac, Joanna Greaney, Mark Ota, and Kal Sabir. For anyone who’s counting, that’s a team of 12 third culture and cross culture artists!

So yes, it’s a small miracle to get all of us in the same place at the same time (especially without any funding at this still-early stage)! But we’re being supported by Kings Place Music Foundation, which has provided space for 6 weekly devising sessions through the summer, and we’re making great progress towards a cohesive narrative frame in which to present the verbatim interview material, character development, and exciting new performance techniques for movement, music, and multimedia.

IMG_0013I’ve been having a great time digging through old notebooks, remembering various exercises and games for devising that could help us to explore new ideas and impulses. We’ve brought in elements of Anne Bogart and Tina Landau’s Viewpoints technique, games from Jessica Swale’s excellent book “Games for Devising,” and exercises adapted from workshops I’ve taken over the years with the Young Vic Directors Programme, FanShen Theatre, Directors Lab West, and other occasions when I’ve been lucky enough to drop in and observe other directors at work.

And of course, one of the many benefits of collaborating with artists who work in other disciplines is that they bring their experience and techniques from movement, dance, music, and even video game performance. Where all these things meet, Home Is Where is slowly coming into being.

Infinity KalWe’ve found a new way of documenting our sessions that might be of interest to any other devisers out there: Google+ Hangouts on Air. It just requires a computer with a webcam and wifi, and allows us to broadcast the session live as well as automatically archive it to YouTube immediately afterwards. (You can adjust the sharing sessions so that no one can find the video without the link.) No more hauling in a camera, tripod, and extra batteries, and no more hours of uploading at home.

The sound is not great in a larger room, and we’ve learned the hard way that discussions held more than about 10 feet from the camera are impossible to make out afterwards. So now when we debrief on a new discovery in devising, we circle up with the computer sitting on the floor alongside us.

Okay, cool, but what are we actually doing?

IMG_0030Taking some feedback we received from our scratch performances, and our own feeling that we needed more narrative drive to sustain a full-length piece, Guleraana and I invented a framework for a story taking place in a far-right political dystopia, in which everyone Not From Here is being sent back where they came from.

(We came up with this before the Brexit vote, but of course, everything that’s happened since then has heavily informed our devising – and made the piece all that more urgent.)

In the first couple of sessions, we focused on character development within our new dystopia framework. One of my favourite exercises was “interviewing” the character about their backstory, attitudes to the others in the world of the play, and how they can contribute to The Resistance. We also got a lot of information out of a “Likert Scale” exercise – asking the actors to position themselves along a linear scale ranging from “strongly agree” to “strongly disagree” in response to various questions. It’s a great way to make some instinctive character decisions without too much thinking or talking – and a very helpful visual representation of which characters might be allies and which might have some conflict.

IMG_2597Our third session was the Monday after Brexit, so we used the weekend’s news and political punditry to stimulate some composition exercises and to generate our “Dystopia Timeline” – a silent brainstorm with blue tac and index cards, of all the events that might happen between the present day and our fictional (we hope!) dystopia.

IMG_2615In our fourth session, our multimedia consultant Ilayda Arden joined us to try out some different ways we could use projection to enhance the storytelling. Using her background in video game theatre with her company Block Stop, Ilayda ran us through some different ways for the characters to interact with a projected image. We’re still finding the “rules” of our performance – how will the dystopia feel, look, move? How does the verbatim material relate to the scripted material? What does it all sound like? Composer Yaiza Varona is working on some ideas for a “Nationless Anthem” – I can’t wait to hear what that’s going to be!

Over the next two weeks, we’ll have two more devising sessions. Number five will bring in sound designer Keri Chesser to help us find the best set-up for our verbatim audio playback, and explore the physicality of the dystopia with movement director Paula Paz. (I’m quite keen to develop a secret handshake for our Resistance characters.) And our sixth session will probably focus on trying out some new text from writer Guleraana Mir, in preparation for the scripting phase, taking place between the end of devising and our August rehearsals at Rich Mix.

Multimedia TrialsI feel so lucky to be working with this brilliant team! Even in just 4 hours a week, we’re making huge leaps forward with the show and with the creation of a solid ensemble. We’re starting to speak the same language and get into the groove of working together – and yet because of our different backgrounds, the room is buzzing with impulses and approaches which unlock new and surprising ideas. This is why I come back to devising and collaboration again and again: two brains are always better than one. Or twelve brains, in this case.

Stay tuned for more devising updates over the next couple of weeks – and check out Home Is Where on the Rich Mix website. Tickets are already on sale!

Families In Global Transition conference 2016

I was honoured to be invited to the 2016 Families in Global Transition conference in Amsterdam, as a David C. Pollock Scholar. Over three packed days, a few hundred Third Culture Kids, expats, immigrants, and nomads gathered together to explore the deep connections of our international community, and new ways to build bridges to the wider world.

Families in Global Transition is a welcoming forum for globally mobile individuals, families, and those working with them. We promote cross-sector connections for sharing research and developing best practices that support the growth, success and well-being of people crossing cultures around the world. www.figt.org

I’m still processing the incredible time I had in Amsterdam, meeting loads of new people, talking about my work in a new way (everyone there already knew about Third Culture Kids – so the element that needed to be explained was experimental verbatim theatre), and learning about all the wonderful initiatives and resources out there for TCKs and globally mobile families.

There was a huge focus on empathy and storytelling, on compassion, on inclusivity, on research, on understanding, on bridge-building. There was a palpable sense of welcome; even though plenty of people were celebrating an annual reunion with friends from around the world, I never felt left out as a first-timer.

The 2016 Pollock Scholars Eric Larsen, Adam Geller, me, Mary Bassey, and Pam Bos Kefi with Michael Pollock (back row centre)

The 2016 David C. Pollock Scholars in green aprons: Eric Larsen, Adam Geller, me, Mary Bassey, and Pam Bos Kefi, with Michael Pollock (back row centre).

Instead, I was in awe of the inspiring history of this community, the TCK pioneers who first gave us a name, pushed for research funding, and put us on the map. The conference itself has grown from a kitchen table conversation in Indianapolis in 1997 to an international event this year. (Next time I’m feeling frustrated about how long it takes to conceive, fund, produce, and create a piece of theatre, I will think of Ruth Van Reken and her 20-year vision.)

It’s difficult to summarise those three busy days into something coherent, so I’ll choose to focus on a new idea that popped up, about how Home Is Where… might contribute to the bigger picture of what’s happening with TCKs all over the world.

It’s always been my ambition to tour the production beyond London – I know that it’s going to be a challenge just to get the minimal team of 7 of us on the road, along with all our props, set, and other equipment. I want to take these stories out to areas of the country that have less exposure to “Others,” where we can offer an alternative to fear-based mainstream messages about people who are “not from here.”

Lately I’ve been wondering about touring even beyond the UK, to festivals and venues in Europe. It’s even more of a logistical challenge, but there are specific funding opportunities for artists bringing their work across cultures and across borders, especially into Europe (…for now. We’ll see what happens with UK’s EU Referendum…)

And then at FIGT, the whole world opens up, and I started to wonder if we could take this to Hong Kong or Singapore, where there are huge communities of internationally mobile people. What about South Africa? Brazil? The States? At what point does this become too big, too expensive, too long-term? (After all, I’m sure my wonderful cast will want to perform in other pieces of theatre eventually…) Is there some other heart of the project that can become internationally mobile, something that’s easier to move than 7 artists?

I’ve forgotten who said the word “franchisable” to me, in passing, after a session about something else. Thank you, mystery muse! A revolutionary word, an idea so big that in the moment, the logical (stubborn) part of my brain said “No, that’s not what we’re doing. That’s not what I was thinking at all.” But of course, one of the central tenets of devising theatre is that the best idea in the room wins, and it can come from anywhere. Even if it totally upends everything you were thinking, it’s the best idea in the room. And it wins.

So that idea kept working on me, and became this:

What if we created a version of Home Is Where… that could tour WITHOUT US? Not to replace the London production and UK/European tour – because I still want to take the piece to new communities and foster dialogue there, find out what people are thinking, run workshops with audiences – but to supplement our in-person work and send these ideas out to places in the world we can’t get to. Because we are finite human beings, with finite time and resources.

What if we published a “create your own” Home Is Where… so that teachers at international schools could do their own version of the piece with their students? There would be a central story with central characters that don’t change – the bit we’re writing and devising this summer – and then students could do interviews in their own communities which would be popped into the existing structure of the piece. Choose 3 responses to the question “where are you from” and insert them here between scenes 1 and 2. Choose 2 stories about feeling out of place and insert them here between scenes 3 and 4. Plug and play verbatim theatre.

Home Is Where… might have just become truly global in its potential. And I think I’ve just signed up a few extra years of my life to this project. Let’s go.

Everything feels just a little bit more possible, nested in the supportive community of Families in Global Transition. I’ve become an FIGT member so I can keep in touch throughout the year, and hopefully get myself back to Amsterdam in 2017 (our first stop on a European tour of Home Is Where…?). I’ve made new connections in the UK and all over the world, people who are interested in getting involved, telling their stories, supporting the piece, suggesting tour venues, bringing their local communities to the theatre.

Huge thanks to everyone at the conference this year, and especially to Michael Pollock and the scholarship committee for inviting me to join you all. Three cheers for the TCK tribe!

Things I Didn’t Know I Didn’t Know

I’ve recently set up a Patreon campaign where you can support my work “per epiphany.” Patreon is a new model for funding artists, based on a very old model for funding artists: patronage. Many of us currently work project-to-project, and it’s difficult to maintain a reliable income that way. So Patreon allows supporters to pay small amounts for small milestones along the way to those big projects. I’ve chosen the “epiphany” as my unit of measurement for progress towards my goals.

So here’s my first Patreon-supported epiphany:

I went to a course yesterday offered by the Independent Theatre Council, on starting a performing arts company. It’s only been a couple of months since I decided “Okay Okay, I’m Starting a Theatre Company” and now I’m getting into the nitty-gritty of it. The morning was a bit scary, a three-hour deluge of things I hadn’t thought of yet, that I would now have to deal with, learn more about, and fill out forms for.

lost in woodsWhen I first moved to London, I made peace with the idea that I was starting again in a new theatre world, with a new network to build and new systems to figure out. It’s been a while since I’ve felt as lost as when I first arrived. I’m not normally apprehensive about legal and financial best practices, having served for 3 years as general manager for the Cutting Ball Theater in San Francisco. I know my way around a spreadsheet and a contract. But the systems of a 501(c)3 non-profit organisation in the United States and the systems of various company structures here in the UK are not the same. At all. The funding landscape is totally different. Employment law is totally different. Even the names for things are totally different.

Around 12:30 I was starting to think: ooh. I didn’t know I didn’t know this stuff. Maybe I’m not ready for this. Everyone said it was not that big a deal to set up a company. But there seems to be a lot to get my head around. There’s already so much work to do, to create and direct a piece of theatre, and now all this about employment law and company accounts? And I can get funding from the Arts Council as an individual (in theory) so maybe I should just…not do this?

And then I had another cup of coffee, chatted with a fellow performance maker over lunch, and we realised that actually the scary things were to do with being responsible for other artists, employing people, treating our collaborators well. Which actually, whether I’m making my work as an individual or as a company, I need to sort that stuff out. And actually, the company paperwork is the easiest part of all this.

So I pulled myself together and turned a new page in my notebook. The afternoon was full of more helpful advice and greater detail about what we’d covered in the morning. There’s still a lot more to work out, but how will I learn until I do it? This is the journey from unfunded individual artist to professional performance company. I’m sure there will be a lot of epiphanies along the way. Not least: don’t do it alone.

If anyone else out there is thinking of starting a theatre company, I’m happy to share my notes and impressions from the course. ITC offers the course 2-3 times a year – keep an eye on their website for the upcoming sessions in August (Edinburgh) or later in the autumn (London). Or you can become a member and get advice year-round.

Join the Hyphenated team!

Exciting news! We’re creating a full-length version of Home is Where… this September with the support of RichMix! We’re looking for a producer, a designer, and a stage manager/verbatim audio technician to join us for the next part of the journey. More details about the roles are below.

[UPDATE 24th MARCH 2016: I’m pleased to announce that the position of creative producer has been filled by Clarissa Widya! We are still looking for a designer and stage manager/audio technician.]

About Home is Where…

IMG_1314Home is Where… is a theatre piece made of real stories collected from interviews with Third Culture Kids, people who grew up in a different culture than their parents and created their own hybrid identities.

It’s verbatim, but not as you know it; the stories of Londoners, but not as you know them. Using scripted dialogue alongside verbatim interviews, movement, and music, Home is Where… explores the complexity, absurdity, and joy of our multicultural lives.

By connecting Third Culture Kids with each other and with audiences around the UK, we hope to change the stories our culture is telling about globalisation, belonging, and what it means to call this country home.

More about the project here! and a 3-minute highlights video of our recent scratch here!

Developing Home is Where…

IMG_1338The core company of Hyphenated formed in 2014, and since then we have conducted more than a dozen interviews with Third Culture Kids.

In January 2016 we presented a 20-minute scratch at Camden People’s Theatre after a short devising period with an expanded creative team (5 performers, director, writer, composer, and movement director). In February 2016 we will reprise this performance at the Cockpit’s Theatre in the Pound scratch night.

Next, we’re looking for three additional collaborators, and pursuing opportunities to develop a full-length piece. In June and July, we plan to begin our R&D with a series of devising sessions, creating material to be shaped during 10 days of rehearsals in August. We will perform the new piece on Friday, 2nd September in the Studio Theatre at RichMix.

We aim to premiere a full production in London in 2017 and then tour the UK.

Alongside the performance, we intend to run audience engagement workshops, which will explore the themes of belonging, home, and Britishness in each community we visit.

We are seeking the following collaborators to join our team

Payment will be made at ITC standard rates, pending funding.

Stage Manager/ Verbatim Audio Technician (from June 2016)

  • support the director with scheduling and managing rehearsals
  • facilitate communication within the creative team, including rehearsal reports
  • film devising sessions and rehearsals and facilitate sharing of video
  • manage verbatim audio files, including cutting, editing, sharing, and performance playback
  • call/operate lighting, sound and verbatim cues in performance
  • bring your personal cross-culture or third-culture experiences to the collaborative process

Designer (from June 2016)

  • attend selected devising dates with an eye to how design can support early performance impulses
  • source set, props, and costumes within the agreed budget and timeline
  • create a flexible design that can tour to venues of various shapes and sizes
  • bring your personal cross-culture or third-culture experiences to the collaborative process

Please email [email protected] if you are interested in getting involved! It will help if you can tell us a little bit about who you are, what you do, and why you’re interested in this project.

Looking forward to hearing from you!

Home Is Where… at Camden People’s Theatre

 

Screen Shot 2016-02-12 at 12.52.46

photos by Charlie Kerson

Home Is Where… is finally real! After two years of collecting interviews, planning, networking, thinking, dreaming, applying, struggling to articulate what exactly this project might become, and finding the right team to create it, Hyphenated became a 9-strong ensemble with a 20-minute first stab at a brand new piece of theatre.

Huge thanks to Camden People’s Theatre for including us in their Whose London Is It Anyway festival, and to supporters Mike Carter, Megan Cohen, Kristin Davis, Beatie Edney, Susie Italiano, Ross McNamara, Paige Rogers, Carolyn Power, Kate Tasker, Michael Tasker, ArtsEd, Hornsey Town Hall, and Kings Place Music Foundation for helping to make our first performance possible.

It’s almost indescribable, the thrill of seeing an idea come to life, of finally sharing with an audience the thing that’s only existed in your imagination until now. It’s an unbelievable gift from my collaborators, who have not only jumped on board with this ambitious project, but made it even more exciting and alive than I first imagined.

We started with some questions: is there a thread that connects Third Culture stories? What does it feel like to tell those stories to TCKs and non-TCKs? How do music and movement contribute to the theatricality of these stories, and relate to the sharing of culture? How can 9 new collaborators, with 9 different hybrid identities, develop a shared language for performance?

The devising and rehearsal process brings up even more questions, often more tangible, more specific ones, like exactly which interviews are we going to use, and who is going to say those words? In a short piece, is it more important to include as many stories as possible, or to give the audience a chance to follow individual characters? What does it mean to cast our actors across race and gender – for example asking an Indian-Scottish man to play a Sardinian woman? The piece is about the connections among cross-culture experiences – so does cross-casting support this idea, or is it confusing for an audience? How might the interviewees feel about being portrayed by someone who looks nothing like them?

And then as we get towards the end of rehearsals, the questions become very technical: how do we edit these audio clips together into one track so that the ending section is not all about pressing play at the right time – about 20 audio clips from various interviews flowing one after the other. And then how do we get all 5 performers to press play at the same time so that their combined audio track is synced up.

What is it like for the cast in that final section, to be hearing the original interview audio through their headphones, listening to their fellow performer repeating the interview verbatim a second or two later, improvising a physical response to the words and Yaiza Varona’s evocative original music… and keeping an ear out for their cue to start speaking? (Answer: it’s almost impossible, and yet they do it beautifully because they are super stars.)

Finally, the performance itself brings up yet more questions: what will the audience think? How does it feel to watch this piece if you, too, are a Third Culture Kid? How does it feel if you’re not? Are the stories clear? Is each moment interesting and meaningful? Do the music, movement, and text blend together in the way that we envisioned?

We’ve received some fantastic responses from audience members and friends, both complimentary and constructive, and we’re already thinking about how to feed those ideas back into the next phase of the piece. Many people said they related strongly to the stories and the ideas of home, nationality, and belonging – whether they were Third Culture Kids or not. I’m thrilled that we’ve received this kind of response already; this sense of community and empathy is exactly what Home Is Where… is all about.

Screen Shot 2016-02-09 at 13.57.57And after the performance: what’s next? Scratch is just the beginning, and there’s loads to do as we prepare for more thinking, developing, devising, and rehearsing towards a full length piece. We’re taking our short version to the Cockpit Theatre this month, for another chance to connect with an audience and gather more feedback, at the Theatre in the Pound scratch night (Monday, 22 February, all tickets £1 on the door).

Behind the scenes, we’re pursuing leads with venues, funders, and potential new members of our TCK team (if you are a producer, designer, or stage manager/audio technician, please get in touch!). With hard work and a little luck, we’ll be back in rehearsal this summer!

For now, I’ll leave you with a little recap of our performance at Camden People’s Theatre at the end of January. Enjoy!

 

 

Okay Okay I’m Starting a Theatre Company

This is what the magic of Open Space looks like. Photo by Paul Whitlock

This is what the magic of Open Space looks like. Photo by Paul Whitlock

Every January for the last eleven years, Improbable Theatre has invited theatre makers to an open space event called Devoted & Disgruntled. Each year, they ask, “What are we going to do about theatre and the performing arts?” and 300 people gather to work on that question. Since my first London January, in 2014, I have kicked off my new year there, in a huge room full of new friends and some inspiring, challenging, electric conversations.

In 2014, it’s where I first met my current collaborators Guleraana Mir and Sharlit Deyzac, along with about a dozen others who shared their Third Culture stories and got involved in what has become Home is Where… a verbatim/movement/music performance by and about Third Culture Kids.

(More on that project here.)

It’s a great place if you have a specific question or issue you want to work on. It’s a great place if you don’t quite know what to do next. It’s a great place to meet new people and learn about what’s going on beyond your immediate network. This year, it was a great reason to visit Birmingham!

As always, I had some really interesting, abstract, socially-engaged, politically-charged, inspiring, mind-expanding conversations. (You can read the whole report, of what 250 people talked about over 3 days on the D&D website here.) And this year, I had a specific question that I asked my colleagues/friends/strangers for help with: do I need to start a company to make my work and pay my collaborators?

I’ve long suspected that in order to realise the ambitious pieces of work that I am dreaming of, I need the kind of support that individual artists just don’t have, certainly not “emerging” or even “mid-career” artists, or artists whose vision lies outside of the mainstream. I need a company. But I’ve also long held a deep resistance to that idea. I really wish there was another model, something in between being a precarious freelance individual artist and an artistic director bogged down with all the administration of a company.

I started a company in San Francisco, called Inkblot Ensemble, so I could make my work and not be dependent on anyone else to give me permission to be an artist. Four core members explored big ideas for three years, made two work-in-progress shows, and grew tremendously as artists. We grew in different directions, so by the time I was moving to London, we agreed to let the company dissolve.

Listening intently to some wisdom at D&D. Still wearing my Christmas jumper in January. Photo by Paul Whitlock

Listening intently to some wisdom at D&D. Still wearing my Christmas jumper in January. Photo by Paul Whitlock

I’m wary of starting up another company in that sense. I’m working with a wonderful team now, on Home is Where… but I don’t know if we’ll be the right collaborators for the next project, and the next, and the next. They each have other projects and ambitions they’re pursuing, too.

I’m wary of creating an artistic entity that’s separate from myself. It’s so much work to establish a name, a website, recognition among peers and potential collaborators. And what would be the identity of a company that is creating a verbatim Third Culture project, a reimagined Helen of Troy performance installation with accompanying solo show, AND a (still very nebulous in its early stages) neuroscience/astronomy theatre piece?

I’ve also been clinging to the idea that if I could “just find a producer” then I could be a precarious freelance individual artist, and it would be fine. But I’m not about to wait around for someone to come and save me from the hard work of getting a piece to the stage. I do need a producer, but until the right collaborator comes along, I’m going to keep making things happen my own way.

So, thank goodness for D&D, where I asked for help and people answered. It turns out that setting up a company in the UK is very different from the US models I’m familiar with. It turns out it’s a very good idea to separate myself as an individual legal entity from the legal entity responsible for the financial health of a production. It turns out that it’s a lot simpler than I thought, with a lot less heavyweight infrastructure. And it turns out that there’s a one-day course in how to get started, run by the Independent Theatre Council. I’ve booked on.

Okay, okay, I’m starting a theatre company.

Declaring my intentions for action at the end of the final day. Photo by Paul Whitlock

Declaring my intentions for action at the end of the final day. Oozing gratitude for the generosity of my fellows. Photo by Paul Whitlock

The next step: what is it going to be? I don’t want to separate myself as an artist from the identity of the company – its purpose is to facilitate my work. I’m getting over my feelings of arrogance, selfishness, and guilt around wanting to create something so focused on ME. It feels so antithetical to the collaborative nature of my work. But I’m looking at artists like Bryony Kimmings, Young Jean Lee, and Pina Bausch, who lead companies which facilitate their collaborative work. Why NOT Amy Clare Tasker Theatre Company? Hmm. Something’s not quite right about that. What if I want to make something that’s not “theatre”?

Why not Amy Clare Tasker Performance Lab Ltd? A fluid collective of artists led by Amy Clare Tasker, telling stories to change the world. Third Culture Kids, Helen of Troy, and Brains & Space are first up, then who knows?

Right now, this could mean I can apply for more funding from more varied sources, pay my collaborators, hire a producer, make things happen faster. In the future, it could mean anything; I’d love to set up regular Lab time, to get together with other artists interested in the beginnings of an idea, to facilitate one-off workshops, peer-to-peer mentoring and skill sharing sessions, and to work towards the big, ambitious productions I’m dreaming of. Watch this space.

Thank goodness for D&D. Watch that space, too. If you’ve never been, do check them out. There are events throughout the year, as well as the annual 3-day brain-melting wonder-fest each January.

Devising Home Is Where…

Joanna Greaney delivers a verbatim monologue via headphones while the cast improvises physical responses to the story.

What do you get when you combine verbatim interviews, improvisation, movement, original music, and a group of 9 new collaborators with rich cross-culture experiences?

I don’t quite know yet – we’re still making it. It’s going to be on stage in the “Whose London Is It Anyway?” festival at Camden People’s Theatre in January. (Early bird tickets are only £7 if you book before 31st December.)

Home is Where… is a theatre piece made of real stories collected from interviews with Third Culture Kids, people who grew up in a different culture than their parents and created their own unique identities out of many influences.

It’s verbatim, but not as you know it; the stories of Londoners, but not as you know them. Using scripted dialogue alongside verbatim interviews, movement, music, and multi-media, Home is Where… explores the complexity, absurdity, and joy of our multicultural lives.

We are more the same than we are different. We are Londoners.

I’m so delighted to be working with writer Guleraana Mir, movement director Paula Paz, and composer Yaiza Varona, along with performers Sharlit Deyzac, Joanna Greaney, Anna-Maria Nabirye, Mark Ota, and Kal Sabir.

It’s been such a long time coming (Sharlit, Guleraana, and I met nearly two years ago and started planning this project), and now we’re finally getting into a rehearsal studio to create a real-life, 3D version of the vision that’s been evolving in our minds since early 2014.

The interviews we’ve done so far are fascinating, personal, profound, moving, funny, surprising… I could go on. Add to that incredible raw material, the off-the-wall creativity of performers with impeccable impulses, and a creative team eager to experiment with new and unusual ways of presenting verbatim material, and we’re well on our way to the next stage of this ambitious project.

The cast responds to the idea of searching for "home" across cultures and continents.

The cast responds to the idea of searching for “home” across cultures and continents.

We have made huge leaps forward in just three short devising sessions, crammed into our busy December schedules, around other projects, day jobs, and holiday commitments. It’s difficult to quantify the work of ensemble building, exploring new techniques, creating characters, and imagining a structure for the piece – but already I’ve learned so much about what this piece could turn into.

For every answer we’ve found, there’s a new question to ask: how can we combine headphone verbatim techniques with viewpoints-inspired movement? How does music affect the way we move? How do our personal experiences enrich our interpretation of the stories of Third Culture Kids we’ve interviewed? How can we frame these stories in an overarching narrative? What might these stories mean to London’s diverse audiences? How do we make the piece accessible and interesting to people who haven’t had a cross-culture childhood?

Tomorrow, writer Guleraana Mir and I begin shaping a script, weaving together the various interview texts, improvisations, movement ideas, and musical impulses we’ve discovered with the ensemble. I can’t wait!

Stay tuned for more news from the rehearsal room in January! For now, you can get a sneak preview of some of the interviews on our online Oral History Library. Plus, much more information about the project is available here.